The Marc Jacobs grunge re-issue – A reset or a reminder

In 2013 Hedi Slimane sent his Autumn / Winter collection for Saint Laurent down the catwalk in Paris, 20 years after the, much derived at the time, infamous Marc Jacobs grunge collection for Perry Ellis.  Slimane’s collection was seen as almost a direct copy of the grunge collection from Spring / Summer 93, with many publications flaunting the side by side catwalk shots of the 2 collections.  Of course, at the time, critics were very quick to dismiss the Marc Jacobs collection, with scathing reviews by the likes of Cathy Horyn and Suzy Menkes.  With the Saint Laurent collection years later, critics were also not as kind to Slimane. Despite this, the Perry Ellis collection has been hailed as a very important in the fashion industry and even more important in the career of Marc Jacobs. 
Fast forward to this year and Marc Jacobs has revealed he will be reissuing many pieces from the collection for his 2019 resort collection.  This is not an inspirational collection, these are actual pieces, remade in as close to the original fabrics as he can, this time under his own name sake rather than Perry Ellis.  
The collection was very important for Jacobs, very much going against the grain of what was happening on the catwalks at the time, as well as being quite far removed from the Perry Ellis muse.  It was a massive risk for him to take, and one which, if it wasn’t for the Grace Coddington styled ‘Grunge & Glory’ Vogue editorial,  may have meant we may not have got to know the iconic designer at all.  The collection over the years was eventually seen as one of the most iconic of its day, eventually copied on the catwalks of many of his peers as well as years later at Saint Laurent.  
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Perry Ellis 1993 – Saint Laurent 2013

So why is the collection, seen as a very progressive and forward thinking collection being brought back?  After exiting his role at Louis Vuitton in 2013 Marc’s career has struggled with trying to focus attention on his own name sake brand.  Already folding his Marc x Marc Jacobs brand into his main collection, the Marc Jacobs brand has become confusing, his collections and his brand just do not feel relevant today.  For the first time since the infamous collection Marc is at a wavering crossroads and bringing back the collection will not just be a reminder of his undeniable legacy but will also help him to refocus on the future, with a reminder that he can, and is, a risk taker.  “The ‘grunge’ collection epitomised the first time in my professional career I was unwavering in my determination to see my vision come to life on the runway, without creative compromise.” he said in a press release.  He had consulted people closest to him, alongside Sarah Andelman, a co-owner of influential retailer Colette, in Paris, for there ideas. The result was to release the capsule grunge collection. “This is not an aggressive sales thing,” Jacobs said. “It’s not like we’re going to redo this collection at one-16th of the price and put it in every store all over the world, we chose a few retailers” — Saks Fifth Avenue and Dover Street Market, among others — “and we won’t show it in the usual way.”
A total of 26 pieces have been replicated.  The original patterns have been lost so the team had to piece together the collection from old photographs and film of the catwalk shows – some of the original fabrics had been taken from frith stores in New York – and permission was granted from the Perry Ellis brand to recreate the looks.  
Marc’s original collection was all about the energy of the moment and doing a redux collection might seem to be going against the grain of what the collection became to represent for Marc Jacobs and his work he continued with Louis Vuitton, turning Vuitton into one of the most sort after street labels of the noughties.  But it also shows that Marc is not willing to sit back and rest on his name sake – he wants to move forward and is using this collection to rest his own creativity, do something new within the fashion world, and then be able to go on to again be a force to be reckoned with and produce collections with an entirely new vision.
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Marc Jacobs Resort 2019

The collection is available now with an ad campaign set to follow shot by Juergen Teller.  
The collection can be seen here on the Marc Jacobs website

Tale Of Us make New York Fashion Week debut of ‘Afterlife’ show

After performing during the pre-show to menswear designer Boris Bidjan Saberi’s at last years NYFW, Italian Techno duo Tale Of Us are back this year with their successful show ‘Afterlife’, debuting at New Yorks Avant Gardner.  The event will be spread across 3 rooms – The Brooklyn Mirage, the Great Hall and the Kings Hall and will include a video installation by media artist Quayola called ‘Jardins d’Été’.  Tale Of Us will accompany the video installation with their Endless album, creating a pice entitled ‘Endless- Jardins’.  

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Tale Of Us have a history with the fashion industry, launching ‘Afterlife x Bruno Bordese’ shoes in 2016 and worked alongside Boris Bidjan Saberi in 2017 to launch their own line ‘Afterlife x 11 by BBS’.  The music producers say they originally created Afterlife, both the event and their record label, in order to have more freedom musically and aesthetically. “It is when you have your own label and event that you can develop your vision without any compromise,” they told Forbes. According to Tale Of Us, the Afterlife event is unique from other shows because of its “overall experience for the senses.”  Afterlife has already held a successful residency in Ibiza this summer and also shown in London, Amsterdam, Miami & Mexico City amongst others.  
The New York event will also feature other talent from the Afterlife label including Recondite, Patrice Bäumel, Hunter / Game & Roland Appel and will take place on Saturday September 8th.  
Afterlife New York Saturday 8th September – Sunday 9th September 

 

The Row to launch menswear this Autumn

After 12 years of producing their first luxury, minimalist collection, Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen are set to release a fully fledged menswear range.   Over the past few years  the twins have been experimenting with menswear, releasing one off capsule collections and shoe collaborations, and are now ready to release a full collection comprising of suits, tailored separates, denim and knitwear.  
The collection will go against the grain of the current growing sector in menswear, slogan t-shirts and hoodies, and focus on the simple, minimalist designs reflecting the work of late 80’s early 90’s work of Helmut Lang as well as the labels namesake tailoring of the area in London, Saville Row.  The tailored pieces are made in Japan “in order to achieve minimal luxurious construction” with traditional European hand-stitch techniques; the shirting is produced in France, the knitwear in Italy and the denim and T-shirts in the U.S.  The range will cost from $3,950 to $5,795 and will be available from The Rows two clothing stores in NY and LA as well as Dover Street Market, Mr Porter and other high end stores.  
After founding their luxury fashion and accessories label in 2005, based on the personal challenge to find the perfect t-shirt, the Olsens have since won three CFDA awards, two for womenswear, and one for accessories.  
The Row
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Mary-Kate & Ashley Olson – Designers

Single Shot – Alexander Fury

AnOther Magazine: How would you connect Fashion to Elegance?
Do they have to connect? I think elegance can intersect with fashion, but it is not necessary. Chanel said that “elegance is refusal”, and that is certainly a section of fashion. Your Célines, your Narciso Rodriguez. The stripped back stuff. But equally, you could not connect elegance with the ugliness and the vulgarity that is an essential and fascinating part of the fashion conversation. The fun stuff. Fun isn’t elegant. Elegance has a connection to a specific area of fashion, which is in fact quite limited; it is neither good nor bad. It is just there.
Fashion is a language: sometimes, it says too much. It’s frequently like being in a crowd and hearing too many people talking at once. Sometimes, I think that high fashion is a dialect, but clothing, overall, is the language. I think of it in the same way as, when you were at the court of Versailles, words were pronounced in a certain way, only perceived by the other courtiers. High fashion speaks with its own dialect, which is very difficult for people outside of it to understand.
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Alexander Fury – Fashion Journalist & Commentator

Three amateur photographers shoot J W Anderson’s Autumn Campaign

In May of this year J W Anderson put out a call for emerging new photography talent to enter a competition to shoot the brands Spring 19 campaign.  Being a part of the NewGen talent given a leg up in London fashion week in 2011, Anderson must of felt it was time to give something back to the next generation of talent coming up through the ranks.  The J W Anderson ‘Your Picture / Our Future’ search eventually yielded the talents of photographers Julie Greve from the UK, Yelena Beletskaya from Russia and Simons Finnerty from the U.S.  
The three photographers were commissioned to shoot the campaign which has just been released and asked to stay true to their individual aesthetic in order to reinvent the brands image.  “This campaign is all about a ‘creative refreshing’,” explained Creative Director Jonathan Anderson in a press release. “We chose to work with three young, talented photographers, all of whom have their own untainted, creative visions. Fundamentally, they were able to grasp the unfiltered essence of the JW Anderson brand.”  
Each photographer was given a selection of ready-to-wear garments and accessories from the brands Autumn collection and were asked to add their unique, distinctive style to the images.  The photographers worked closely along side stylist for the brand Benjamin Bruno as well as Anderson himself.  “It’s been kind of amazing. We had nearly 2,000 entries from all across the world: Japan, China, Argentina, Russia, Canada, the USA, everywhere” said Anderson.  The final images are strikingly individual, but remain thoroughly in line with “the unfiltered essence of the JW Anderson brand”.
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J W Anderson – Designer

 

Why British designer Daniel Lee’s appointment at Bottega Veneta is very exciting

Just 48 hours after Creative Director Tomas Maier announced he was stepping down after 17 years at the helm of Bottega Veneta, the company has announced British designer Daniel Lee is set to take over on July 1st.  Although relatively unknown outside of the fashion industry, 32 yr old Lee, a graduate of Central Saint Martins, has so far worked along side some of the most outstanding current brands today.  After putting in stints at Maison Margiela, Balenciaga & Donna Karen, the designer most recently was Director of Ready-to-Wear at Céline were he began in 2012.
Following Phoebe Philo’s departure late last year, and the appointment of Hedi Slimane, who is tearing the house apart to continue in his inimitable style, Lee would have been out of a job.  Meanwhile Kerring, the luxury conglomerate that owns Bottega Veneta, have been appointing some shrewd Creative Directors within its houses in recent years, most notably Alessandro Michele at Gucci & Demna Gvasalia at Balenciaga.  And after quite public fraught tension with Hedi at Saint Laurent, employing Lee from Céline will go some way to keeping the minimalist understated style of Céline alive once Hedi turns the brand on its head, and bring some fresh vitality to Bottega Veneta in the same way both Michele & Gvasalia have to their houses.  “Daniel Lee has a deep understanding of the house’s current challenges both in terms of creation and development.” said Claus Dietrich Lahrs, CEO of Bottega Veneta. “He will bring to Bottega Veneta a new and distinctive creative language that will continue building the house’s success based on the ambitious foundations already developed over recent years.”
Former Creative Director Tomas Maier has laid the foundations for the house in the past 17 years but recent years have seen a steady decline in profits.  Maier was known for his strict detailing and rejected out-and-out branding for a more subtle approach.  
“I’m both honored and excited to continue the legacy that has been created at Bottega Veneta over the last five decades,” said Lee. “Maintaining the ingrained codes of the House, craftsmanship, quality and sophistication, I look forward to evolving what has gone before, while contributing a new perspective and modernity.”  Daniel will start at Bottega Veneta in July with his first collection in September. 
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Daniel Lee – Creative Director Bottega Veneta

 

Gucci pays homage to Bjork in Gucci Garden exhibition

As the first night of Pitti Uomo got under way, Gucci revealed three new hall spaces in its Gucci Garden space in Florence, two of which pay tribute to singer Bjork.  Creative director Alessandro Michele collaborated with Bjork last year when he designed unique pieces for the musicians music video ‘The Gate’.   The outfits and masks from the video will be on show as well as the special custom gown, which took approximately 555 hours to create and a further 320 hours for the intricate embroidery work.  The moulded masks, designed by James Merry, another organza dress and the Gucci shoes will also be on show, alongside various books and artefacts on the singer and her home country of Iceland.  
The third room will be occupied by 23 year old British artist Isabella Cotier, who has collaborated on a Gucci Garden exclusive of T shirts, Hoodies, Sweatpants and Totes, all emblazoned with Cotier’s colourful illustrations depicting eccentric Florentine characters in prominent places around the city.  The collaboration with Cotier follows the collection of clothing, porcelain mugs and candle holders the brand developed with Jayde Fish.
Gucci Garden, Piazza della Signoria, 10, 50122 Firenze, Florence.