Liverpool to host first UK major retrospective of Keith Haring

The late iconic Artist & Activist Keith Haring will have his first major UK retrospective shown in June 2019 at Tate Liverpool.  A legend of the New York art scene, the show will include 85 works by the artist including paintings, drawings, photographs and videos, all encapsulating the 1980’s underground that the artist embodied.  Best known for his iconic motifs, such as barking dogs, crawling babies and flying saucers, Haring’s work was politically charged and motivated by activism, with Haring’s work as an AIDS activist and educator remaining his most essential legacy.  Having evolved from the street scene and club culture of the early 80’s, with his graffiti style being seen at such legendary clubs as Paradise Garage, he later went on to work in the same circles as Jean Michel Basquiat, Andy Warhol, Madonna, Vivienne Westwood & Grace Jones.  He was also an active member of the legendary Club 57 in New York, where he gave performances and organised exhibitions. 
Writing for ID magazine Ryan White declared  “Though much has changed in the world since the 1908’s, and HIV/AIDS no longer as much of a threat in NYC, a lot of the themes Haring’s explored — opioid addiction, racism, police brutality, environmental damage, war — remain as present and urgent as ever. An expansive retrospective, then, couldn’t be more welcome”.  In 1988 Haring was diagnosed with AIDS and set up the Keith Haring foundation to support children’s programs and organisations dedicated to raising AIDS awareness.  He later died in 1990 aged 31.  
The following is an excerpt from the Keith Haring foundation regarding his love of New York nightlife and Music, particularly the Paradise Garage – 
“Wherever Keith Haring was working, either on the street or in his studio, music was always playing. Haring’s work embodies the sounds of the New York streets and of streetwise clubs like Paradise Garage. You can almost hear the music that infuses the visual rhythm of his work. Haring was one of the rare artists who was able to visualize sound.
Reminiscing about Keith Haring and the Paradise Garage, Ann Magnuson wrote that “dancing was our pagan rite and the Paradise Garage, the first multi-cultural gay dance club, became Keith’s Pantheon.” In his journals, Haring wrote, “I don’t know if you know how important the Paradise Garage is, at least for me and the tribe of people who have shared many a collective spiritual experience there. The Garage also changed or affected my life incredibly through various ‘re-imprinting’ experiences and transformations.” Haring would even schedule his trips around the Garage, “leaving on Sundays and returning before or on Saturdays.”
The exhibition  ‘Keith Haring’  takes place 14th June – 10th November 2019  Tate Liverpool, Albert Dock, Liverpool L3 4BB
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Keith Haring – Artist

The Marc Jacobs grunge re-issue – A reset or a reminder

In 2013 Hedi Slimane sent his Autumn / Winter collection for Saint Laurent down the catwalk in Paris, 20 years after the, much derived at the time, infamous Marc Jacobs grunge collection for Perry Ellis.  Slimane’s collection was seen as almost a direct copy of the grunge collection from Spring / Summer 93, with many publications flaunting the side by side catwalk shots of the 2 collections.  Of course, at the time, critics were very quick to dismiss the Marc Jacobs collection, with scathing reviews by the likes of Cathy Horyn and Suzy Menkes.  With the Saint Laurent collection years later, critics were also not as kind to Slimane. Despite this, the Perry Ellis collection has been hailed as a very important in the fashion industry and even more important in the career of Marc Jacobs. 
Fast forward to this year and Marc Jacobs has revealed he will be reissuing many pieces from the collection for his 2019 resort collection.  This is not an inspirational collection, these are actual pieces, remade in as close to the original fabrics as he can, this time under his own name sake rather than Perry Ellis.  
The collection was very important for Jacobs, very much going against the grain of what was happening on the catwalks at the time, as well as being quite far removed from the Perry Ellis muse.  It was a massive risk for him to take, and one which, if it wasn’t for the Grace Coddington styled ‘Grunge & Glory’ Vogue editorial,  may have meant we may not have got to know the iconic designer at all.  The collection over the years was eventually seen as one of the most iconic of its day, eventually copied on the catwalks of many of his peers as well as years later at Saint Laurent.  
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Perry Ellis 1993 – Saint Laurent 2013

So why is the collection, seen as a very progressive and forward thinking collection being brought back?  After exiting his role at Louis Vuitton in 2013 Marc’s career has struggled with trying to focus attention on his own name sake brand.  Already folding his Marc x Marc Jacobs brand into his main collection, the Marc Jacobs brand has become confusing, his collections and his brand just do not feel relevant today.  For the first time since the infamous collection Marc is at a wavering crossroads and bringing back the collection will not just be a reminder of his undeniable legacy but will also help him to refocus on the future, with a reminder that he can, and is, a risk taker.  “The ‘grunge’ collection epitomised the first time in my professional career I was unwavering in my determination to see my vision come to life on the runway, without creative compromise.” he said in a press release.  He had consulted people closest to him, alongside Sarah Andelman, a co-owner of influential retailer Colette, in Paris, for there ideas. The result was to release the capsule grunge collection. “This is not an aggressive sales thing,” Jacobs said. “It’s not like we’re going to redo this collection at one-16th of the price and put it in every store all over the world, we chose a few retailers” — Saks Fifth Avenue and Dover Street Market, among others — “and we won’t show it in the usual way.”
A total of 26 pieces have been replicated.  The original patterns have been lost so the team had to piece together the collection from old photographs and film of the catwalk shows – some of the original fabrics had been taken from frith stores in New York – and permission was granted from the Perry Ellis brand to recreate the looks.  
Marc’s original collection was all about the energy of the moment and doing a redux collection might seem to be going against the grain of what the collection became to represent for Marc Jacobs and his work he continued with Louis Vuitton, turning Vuitton into one of the most sort after street labels of the noughties.  But it also shows that Marc is not willing to sit back and rest on his name sake – he wants to move forward and is using this collection to rest his own creativity, do something new within the fashion world, and then be able to go on to again be a force to be reckoned with and produce collections with an entirely new vision.
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Marc Jacobs Resort 2019

The collection is available now with an ad campaign set to follow shot by Juergen Teller.  
The collection can be seen here on the Marc Jacobs website

Artists Turntable Re-Designs for Charity Auction

10 Artists, including Gavin Turk, Jake & Dinos Chapman and Jeremy Deller have been asked by Secret 7″ to design a one-off turntable for the Planar 1/1 exhibition, to be auctioned on-line with the proceeds going to the mental health charity Mind.  Each artist was given a blank Rega Planer turntable and were given free reign to add there own creation onto the turntable.  The Re-Designs follows a set of artists including Anish Kapoor who created one off record sleeves for Secret 7″ earlier this year.  
The turntables include a Gavin Turk ‘Blue Plaque’ design, referencing his Cave piece, Stuart Semple’s nod to Joy Division, including lyrics from Disorder,  The Chapman brothers colour etching and James Joyce’s Smiley faces.  The 10 Turntables will be on display at The Ace Hotel Lobby in Shoreditch until tomorrow evening when they will be auctioned, there will be a public event in the Hotel lobby on the night including a Dj set by Gavin Turk and Pete Fowler.  
More info:  Secret 7″  Ace Hotel Shoreditch 

Tale Of Us make New York Fashion Week debut of ‘Afterlife’ show

After performing during the pre-show to menswear designer Boris Bidjan Saberi’s at last years NYFW, Italian Techno duo Tale Of Us are back this year with their successful show ‘Afterlife’, debuting at New Yorks Avant Gardner.  The event will be spread across 3 rooms – The Brooklyn Mirage, the Great Hall and the Kings Hall and will include a video installation by media artist Quayola called ‘Jardins d’Été’.  Tale Of Us will accompany the video installation with their Endless album, creating a pice entitled ‘Endless- Jardins’.  

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Tale Of Us have a history with the fashion industry, launching ‘Afterlife x Bruno Bordese’ shoes in 2016 and worked alongside Boris Bidjan Saberi in 2017 to launch their own line ‘Afterlife x 11 by BBS’.  The music producers say they originally created Afterlife, both the event and their record label, in order to have more freedom musically and aesthetically. “It is when you have your own label and event that you can develop your vision without any compromise,” they told Forbes. According to Tale Of Us, the Afterlife event is unique from other shows because of its “overall experience for the senses.”  Afterlife has already held a successful residency in Ibiza this summer and also shown in London, Amsterdam, Miami & Mexico City amongst others.  
The New York event will also feature other talent from the Afterlife label including Recondite, Patrice Bäumel, Hunter / Game & Roland Appel and will take place on Saturday September 8th.  
Afterlife New York Saturday 8th September – Sunday 9th September 

 

Mysterious Antwerp Six designer Marina Yee to show first collection in over 10 years

One of the more forgotten of the Antwerp 6, Marina Yee is set to return 10 years after her last collection with a new collection to be shown at the concept store Laila Tokio in Tokyo.  Marina graduated at the Royal Academy, Antwerp in 1981 alongside the Dries Van Noten, Ann Demeulemeester and Dirk Van Saene and went on to show in London as part of the  Antwerp 6.  Yee then left the group in 1988, setting up her own label to great success but did not want her brand to become large and commercial and so only released small collections off the traditional catwalk schedule, showing her final collection in 2005.
Titled the M.Y. project, the collection will include clothing and textiles from flea-markets reimagined and reconstructed into 5 new designs alongside archive pieces and handpicked artwork.  Yee’s work has always centred around the reconstruction of garments found at flea markets in an effort to ‘battle the materialistic wastefulness’ associated with fashion.  Yee was at the forefront of recycled and eco-friendly fashion before the issue of eco-consciousness really hit the mainstream.  
She calls the latest collection  “the micro-collection.  It’s very small and it’s a reaction against the over-offering of so many choices today that lacks soul.”  The opportunity, said Yee, came about after the vintage shop, which previously hosted pop-ups selling Helmut Lang archive pieces and Phoebe Philo‘s first collection for Céline, purchased some of her designs at an auction.  With her latest collection she hopes to shine a light on sustainability within the industry. 
The collection can be seen at   Laila Tokio    1-5-11-2f, Shibuya, Shibuya-Ku, Tokyo   from 30 August  
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Marina Yee – Designer

 

The Row to launch menswear this Autumn

After 12 years of producing their first luxury, minimalist collection, Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen are set to release a fully fledged menswear range.   Over the past few years  the twins have been experimenting with menswear, releasing one off capsule collections and shoe collaborations, and are now ready to release a full collection comprising of suits, tailored separates, denim and knitwear.  
The collection will go against the grain of the current growing sector in menswear, slogan t-shirts and hoodies, and focus on the simple, minimalist designs reflecting the work of late 80’s early 90’s work of Helmut Lang as well as the labels namesake tailoring of the area in London, Saville Row.  The tailored pieces are made in Japan “in order to achieve minimal luxurious construction” with traditional European hand-stitch techniques; the shirting is produced in France, the knitwear in Italy and the denim and T-shirts in the U.S.  The range will cost from $3,950 to $5,795 and will be available from The Rows two clothing stores in NY and LA as well as Dover Street Market, Mr Porter and other high end stores.  
After founding their luxury fashion and accessories label in 2005, based on the personal challenge to find the perfect t-shirt, the Olsens have since won three CFDA awards, two for womenswear, and one for accessories.  
The Row
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Mary-Kate & Ashley Olson – Designers

Single Shot – Alexander Fury

AnOther Magazine: How would you connect Fashion to Elegance?
Do they have to connect? I think elegance can intersect with fashion, but it is not necessary. Chanel said that “elegance is refusal”, and that is certainly a section of fashion. Your Célines, your Narciso Rodriguez. The stripped back stuff. But equally, you could not connect elegance with the ugliness and the vulgarity that is an essential and fascinating part of the fashion conversation. The fun stuff. Fun isn’t elegant. Elegance has a connection to a specific area of fashion, which is in fact quite limited; it is neither good nor bad. It is just there.
Fashion is a language: sometimes, it says too much. It’s frequently like being in a crowd and hearing too many people talking at once. Sometimes, I think that high fashion is a dialect, but clothing, overall, is the language. I think of it in the same way as, when you were at the court of Versailles, words were pronounced in a certain way, only perceived by the other courtiers. High fashion speaks with its own dialect, which is very difficult for people outside of it to understand.
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Alexander Fury – Fashion Journalist & Commentator